Unique, practical knowledge for nurses responsible for daily management of patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related conditions.

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Monday, 01 June 2009
Severe seasonal allergic rhinitis (hayfever) has a significant impact on sufferers’ quality of life and productivity, and can be a challenging condition to manage in primary care. As a majority of these patients have poor or only partial symptom control in primary care, they may be suitable for referral to secondary care. Some of these patients may be appropriate for treatment with specific allergen immunotherapy and this article reviews the impact of severe seasonal allergic rhinitis and highlights recent data on the effectiveness of sublingual immunotherapy.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 01 June 2009
To be able to effectively manage patients with airflow obstruction in general practice it is imperative that we can differentiate between asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although COPD and asthma share many clinical features, they are different conditions with different airway inflammation and parenchymal patterns.
Category: Back to Basics
Monday, 01 June 2009
Category: Back to Basics
Monday, 01 June 2009
Allergic or other immunological mechanisms are thought to account for 6-20% of all adverse drug reactions, but in most cases the mechanism is unclear. This article provides an in-depth review of drug allergy – adverse drug reactions with a known immunological mechanism or with clinical features that mimic an immunological reaction.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 01 June 2009
The Department of Health’s Expert Patient Programme recognises the role of selfmanagement in many different disease areas and its report Self Care recommends the concept of encouraging people with long-term conditions to self-manage where possible. Diabetes management would never succeed without the active participation of the person with the condition and asthma management plans have been advocated for some time for people with asthma. What can self-management plans achieve in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)?
Category: Editorial
Monday, 01 June 2009
Patients with recurrent pleural effusions have, to date, mainly been cared for in hospital. Many have had to undergo repeated hospital admissions, extended hospitalisation, discomfort and time away from home. This is particularly the case in patients with recurrent malignant pleural effusion (MPE). However, new technologies mean that these patients may be managed by close co-operation between primary and secondary care. This article describes some exciting developments in the management of pleural effusions in a PCT.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 01 June 2009
Category: Back to Basics
Monday, 01 June 2009
This year there is more reason than ever for people to stop smoking, with the ban on smoking in public places coming into force in July. How can we support smokers who want to quit? In this article, we provide a comprehensive guide to resources that can help.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 01 June 2009
Abnormal breathlessness is a common symptom with a wide variety of causes and it can be quite a challenge to diagnose the cause and plan appropriate treatment. Practice nurses are often the first point of contact for patients with these conditions and play an important role as part of the multidisciplinary healthcare team. This article completes a series of three on causes of breathlessness (‘The breathless patient: is it asthma or COPD?’ Vol 2, Issue 1, December 2007 and ‘Respiratory causes of breathlessness.’ Vol 2, Issue 2, March 2008).
Category: Editorial

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