Unique, practical knowledge for nurses responsible for daily management of patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related conditions.

Topic:

Monday, 01 June 2009
Asthma affects more than 5 million people of all ages in the UK today. The vast majority of asthma is diagnosed and managed in primary care and most people with asthma rarely need to see a hospital specialist. Until recently it has been difficult to measure the level of inflammation seen in asthma accurately in general practice. However, new techniques such as exhaled nitric oxide measurement are now available for use and this article provides GP and nurse perspectives on the potential of such techniques in primary care.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 01 June 2009
Practice nurses often get to know their patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) very well. Over the years, they have attended for reviews, flu injections and when they have exacerbations. Nurses get to know their families as well as the patient, and it can be hard to observe the inevitable deterioration as the condition progresses. This article will outline some of the key issues for practice nurses when their patients start to have frequent hospital admissions or cannot attend the surgery for reviews. Has their condition become palliative, and what can practice nurses contribute to their care?
Category: Editorial
Monday, 01 June 2009
UK primary care health professionals work under increasing demands and time pressures. While a large proportion of their workload is demand-led (ie by patients presenting with specific clinical problems), a significant amount of the work relates to ongoing monitoring and care of patients with chronic illness. While most practices in the UK achieve a high level of points in the Quality and Outcome Framework (QOF) for caring for patients with asthma, the standard of the reviews for these patients may not reach a level recommended in national and international guidelines. A structured approach may, therefore, be helpful in ensuring quality of care for these patients. This article describes an approach to reviewing patients with asthma, whether they present in surgery acutely, for follow-up of uncontrolled episodes or for routine review.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 01 June 2009
The NICE Technology Appraisal of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) published in March 2008 has led to dramatically increased referrals for sleep apnoea in most areas. Together with the National ‘Referral to Treatment’ (RTT) 18-week target, there is mounting pressure on Primary Care Trusts to identify patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). This article describes how OSA can be identified and diagnosed, and how CPAP can be managed in primary care.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 01 June 2009
The number of respiratory consultations in primary care increases in the winter months. We see more patients with acute exacerbations of their underlying respiratory condition, such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) caused by the cold weather and the increased number of viruses and airborne infections that occur at this time of year. So what advice should we give to patients with cold and flu-type symptoms during the winter? And is the approach we take with respiratory patients in any way different from the approach taken with otherwise healthy individuals?
Category: Editorial
Monday, 01 June 2009
Category: Back to Basics
Monday, 01 June 2009
Category: Back to Basics
Monday, 01 June 2009
Category: Back to Basics
Monday, 01 June 2009
Skills in developing a business case may at first seem to be something far removed from what a nurse would need. After all we are clinicians, we do the clinical things and managers do things like business cases. How wrong could you be? This article shows just how important business planning can be to both nurses and our patients.
Category: Editorial

Article search and filter