Unique, practical knowledge for nurses responsible for daily management of patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related conditions.

Topic: Peripheral ar

Monday, 28 February 2005
Category: Back to Basics
Thursday, 20 September 2007

Practice and other community-based nurses play a central role in achieving high quality wound care in patients treated initially in general practice and in those who have been discharged from hospital. This article summarises some of the wound management products available for chronic wounds, and the importance of continued wound care in the primary care setting, before focusing on one of the latest approaches – total negative pressure (TNP).

Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 27 September 2006
Category: Back to Basics
Friday, 07 December 2012

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has had a lower profile than other vascular diseases, but it is moving up the agenda following recent publication of guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Take a look at NICE's priorities for implementation, and you will see that using the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) to check for PAD is set to become part of routine cardiovascular risk assessment in primary care.

Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 16 July 2008

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), also known as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), is a vascular condition which affects the legs. It is caused by atherosclerosis – narrowing and hardening of the arteries – and has previously been described as being similar to angina in the legs. Sufferers get cramping pains in their legs when they walk, which is relieved by rest. This is similar to the chest pain that occurs in people with coronary heart disease (CHD). The similarities between CHD and PAD do not end there: the causes and treatments also overlap. In this article, we explore how two patients presented with symptoms suggestive of PAD and how they were treated.

Category: Editorial
Monday, 28 February 2005

Foot complications are very common in patients with diabetes. At least one in six diabetics develop foot ulcers at some point in their lives. This article reviews why foot complications occur in diabetes, how you can detect foot problems early, and treatment and prevention strategies. The National Service Framework for Diabetes suggests that targeted foot care for people at high risk could save hundreds of amputations a year. By detecting complications earlier, we can make a real difference to patients' lives, reducing morbidity, improving quality of life and even saving limbs.

Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 23 January 2018

A new handheld imaging device called MolecuLight i:X has been launched by Smith and Nephew to improve decision making in wound care. The device allows doctors or nurses to improve wound assessments by accurately measuring the presence and distribution of potentially harmful bacteria.

Category: Have You Heard
Thursday, 07 February 2019

A new simple device has been designed to improve venous blood flow of people when seated and to help in the prevention, care and treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The RBR legflow™ was created with the input of Professor Richard Beasley, director of the Medical Research Institute of New Zealand (MRINZ) and a world authority on respiratory medicine.

Category: Have You Heard
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