Unique, practical knowledge for nurses responsible for daily management of patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related conditions.

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Tuesday, 01 September 2009

Lowering LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has rightly become a core activity for primary care health professionals. However, despite effective lowering of LDL-C, many patients still suffer cardiovascular events. Experts have called this 'the residual risk' and have speculated whether further cardiovascular events can be prevented by attention to other lipoprotein fractions, particularly HDL cholesterol (HDL-C).

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 23 March 2006

The metabolic syndrome is characterised by a cluster of metabolic risk factors which may include abdominal obesity, dyslipidaemia, high blood pressure and insulin resistance or glucose intolerance. Patients with this cluster are at increased risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The dominant underlying risk factors for the syndrome are abdominal obesity and insulin resistance – so the epidemic of obesity means that we will be seeing a major increase in cases of metabolic syndrome over the next few years. Management requires tight control of all risk factors, with weight loss and prevention of weight gain being important preventive measures.

Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 07 June 2017
Over recent years there has been growing attention on cardiovascular disease prevention through improved detection and management of the high risk conditions such as atrial fibrillation, high blood pressure and high cholesterol in different parts of the country. Dr Matt Kearney, National Clinical Director for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention describes a number of encouraging national developments.
Category: Have You Heard
Friday, 23 February 2018

Stories in this Evidence in Practice include:

  • Health survey for England, 2016: The good and the bad news
  • Healthy lifestyle changes have a long-term benefit for type 2 diabetes prevention
  • Weight loss diets reduce the risk of premature death for people with obesity
  • Very low calorie diet can achieve a remission of Type 2 Diabetes
  • Dash diet plus sodium reduction lowers systolic blood pressure
  • Long-term follow-up underscores benefits of lowering LDL-C in CVD primary prevention
  • Blood pressure self-monitoring is more effective with professional support
  • AF and other chronic conditions = higher risk of death
  • Clinical trials underestimate the real-world impact of Atherosclerotic CVD
  • The burden of heart failure continues to rise in the UK
Tuesday, 05 July 2016

Drugs used to treat diabetes could also be used to treat Alzheimer’s disease, and vice versa, according to new basic research from the University of Aberdeen. This is also the first study of its kind to show that Alzheimer’s disease can lead to diabetes, as opposed to diabetes occurring first as was previously thought.

Monday, 17 July 2017
A new study has announced the new QRISK3 cardiovascular disease risk prediction algorithm. The calculator is used to work out the risk of developing a heart attack or stroke over the next 10 years. The risk calculator is designed for use in the UK.
Tuesday, 14 June 2016

This month’s Back to Basics feature is a free wallchart to aid interpretation of the NHS Health Check results. Use this information with last month’s Back to Basics NHS Health Check chart to raise your patients’ awareness of cardiovascular risk factors and to determine the best lifestyle and medical approaches for each individual.

Category: Back to Basics
Monday, 12 September 2016

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) has a major impact on the health and quality of life of patients and there is often co-morbidity with cardiovascular disease. Well planned and structured training for the primary care team could have a major impact on outcomes.

Category: Editorial
Monday, 21 March 2011

We have all seen paintings of early physicians looking at flasks of urine to give an indication of a person's health. And most of us can remember days of rows of urine pots lined up to test for new patients in primary care and in hospital outpatient clinics. We may assume that those days have gone in the era of blood testing and CT scans. So why do we have a cluster of urine pots on the cover of this issue of BJPCN and why are we suggesting that urine testing has a central role in finding patients with previously undiagnosed cardiovascular disease?

Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 28 September 2011

We have all seen paintings of early physicians looking at flasks of urine to give an indication of a person's health. And most of us can remember days of rows of urine pots lined up to test for new patients in primary care and in hospital outpatient clinics. We may assume that those days have gone in the era of blood testing and CT scans. So why are we suggesting that urine testing has a central role in finding patients with previously undiagnosed cardiovascular disease?

Category: Editorial
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