Unique, practical knowledge for nurses responsible for daily management of patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related conditions.

Evidence in Practice

Monday, 25 April 2016

A study from the United States shows that sleeping problems in women are associated with a significantly increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. These sleeping disorders included ‘sleeping difficulty’, frequent snoring, sleep duration ≤6 hours, sleep apnoea or rotating shift work.

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Monday, 25 April 2016

A new study suggests that women on anticoagulant therapy are able to take hormonal contraception or HRT with no increased risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) or abnormal uterine bleeding.

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Wednesday, 23 March 2016

Spironolactone is more effective at lowering blood pressure than bisoprolol or doxazosin in people with resistant hypertension, according to results from the PATHWAY-2 study. This summary also includes details from the NICE 2011 hypertension guidelines.

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Wednesday, 23 March 2016

A major study funded by the National Institute for Health Research concludes that more frequent lipid monitoring strategies are cost-effective when compared with other longer interval strategies to guide treatment for prevention of cardiovascular disease.

Wednesday, 23 March 2016

Results from the ADVANCE trial support the need for intensive efforts to promote smoking cessation in people with diabetes. As well as increased risks to cardiovascular health in all diabetic patients who smoke, women with diabetes who smoke appear to be at a greater risk of coronary events than men.

Wednesday, 23 March 2016

Professor Mike Kirby examines the evidence for the benefits of the NHS Health Check following a recent editorial casting doubts on the programme. Other emerging evidence suggests that the programme helps to reduce health inequalities and is effective at case finding for major physiological risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes.

Wednesday, 23 March 2016

Women with diabetes appear to be at a higher risk of developing vascular dementia than men, according to the results of a major systematic review including >2 million people published in Diabetes Care.

Wednesday, 03 December 2014

Providing need-to-know information and recommended actions resulting from new clinical research

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