Unique, practical knowledge for nurses responsible for daily management of patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related conditions.

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Wednesday, 28 September 2011
Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 28 September 2011

What exactly is chronic kidney disease (CKD), what causes it and how is it diagnosed? In this article we get down to the basics of defining what CKD is, and explore the stages of CKD. We review CKD progression and the assessment and management recommendations for each stage of CKD.

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 21 May 2009

What exactly is chronic kidney disease (CKD), what causes it and how is it diagnosed? In this article we get down to the basics of defining what CKD is, and explore the stages of CKD. We review CKD progression and the assessment and management recommendations for each stage of CKD.

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 21 May 2009

The NICE guideline for chronic kidney disease (CKD) was introduced in 2008, with the aim of assisting practitioners both in primary and secondary care in the early identification and management of patients with evidence of kidney disease. However, some debate still exists surrounding the implementation of this guideline in everyday clinical practice. In this article, we sort out

Category: Editorial
Sunday, 18 June 2006

The most common cause of chronic kidney failure is diabetes, which accounts for between 30 and 40% of all cases. Chronic kidney disease is a long-term condition usually taking between fifteen and twenty years to reach the final stages. Although 30% of all people with type 2 diabetes will develop some degree of kidney disease, only a minority go on to develop end-stage renal failure. In this article, we look at the benefits of early detection and treatment in slowing the progression of renal impairment.

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 20 September 2007

Around 2.9 million people in the UK have moderate-to-severe kidney disease. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) can help to identify patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and improve the prevention and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this article, we explain why it is important to detect CKD early, how eGFR is calculated and how to reduce risk in patients found to have impaired kidney function.

Category: Editorial
Friday, 07 December 2012

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is becoming increasingly common. Patients at greatest risk are the elderly with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and other long-term conditions such as hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. AKI carries a poor prognosis yet 30% of cases are preventable. In primary care we can help prevent AKI by empowering patients to take drug holidays—that is, temporarily stopping medications that become harmful to the kidneys during episodes of acute illness.

Category: Editorial
Monday, 19 May 2008

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common, harmful and treatable. The recognition of CKD as a public health problem has evolved, in part, from the acceptance of the conceptual model of CKD as a vascular risk factor and the introduction of a standard definition and classification of CKD. In this article, we look at the impact of CKD, its close association with cardiovascular disease and how to optimise its detection and management in primary care today.

Category: Editorial
Monday, 06 June 2011

Chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD) is a slowly progressive complication of CKD occurring over many years. The kidneys are unable to maintain normal levels of calcium and phosphate and respond to the hormones needed to maintain healthy bones. CKD–MBD is a common problem in people with stage 3 CKD onwards and affects almost all patients receiving dialysis. This article explains why renal bone disease occurs, the problems it can cause for patients affected and provides practical tips on how to identify people at risk and management options.

Category: Editorial
Monday, 28 February 2005

Renal disease is common and is increasing in prevalence as the main risk factor for impaired kidney function – diabetes – affects more people. Approximately 30% of patients with type 2 diabetes develop some degree of nephropathy, with some ethnic groups at even higher risk. Diabetes is now the largest single cause of end-stage renal disease in the UK, accounting for 30–40% of all cases. The very early stages are asymptomatic and the disease process develops slowly over 15–20 years, so early screening and prevention strategies are paramount in reducing the burden of renal failure. Primary care nurses are well placed to play a pivotal role in this process.

Category: Editorial

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