Unique, practical knowledge for nurses responsible for daily management of patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related conditions.

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Thursday, 21 May 2009

Diet and lifestyle strategies are essential in the treatment and possibly in the prevention of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Dietary modification plays a fundamental role in helping to control increased levels of blood electrolytes and metabolic waste products that are often seen as renal function declines. Evidence already exists to support the benefit of dietary and lifestyle modification in the management of diabetes and hypertension, which are two of the leading causes of CKD, and evidence is emerging that diet is crucial in halting the progression of CKD.

Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 28 September 2011

Diet and lifestyle strategies are essential in the treatment and possibly in the prevention of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Dietary modification plays a fundamental role in helping to control increased levels of blood electrolytes and metabolic waste products that are often seen as renal function declines. Dietary and lifestyle modification may not directly influence disease progression in CKD, but several lifestyle factors have been highlighted as important due to the significant influence they exert over associated factors such as diabetes and hypertension, which are two of the leading causes of CKD, and obesity.

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 21 May 2009
Category: Back to Basics
Wednesday, 28 September 2011
Category: Back to Basics
Wednesday, 28 September 2011
Category: Back to Basics
Thursday, 21 May 2009

Organ transplants can save or dramatically improve lives, yet figures for 11 February 2009 showed there were 7,903 people in the UK still on waiting lists for transplants, with the majority waiting for a kidney transplant. Last year, more than 400 people died while on the transplant waiting list.

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 21 May 2009

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a high mortality rate once it reaches the most severe stage. However, complications can be reduced and even prevented if it is diagnosed and treated earlier. Many people who develop CKD become symptomatic only when the disease is well established. By that point, the opportunity for some of the interventions aimed at minimising the impact of the disease has passed. Nurses working in general practice are well placed to recognise people at risk for CKD, diagnose them early and ensure that treatment is initiated and optimised to protect their renal and cardiovascular health.

Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 28 September 2011

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a high mortality rate once it reaches the most severe stage. However, complications can be reduced and even prevented if it is diagnosed and treated earlier. Many people who develop CKD become symptomatic only when the disease is well established. By that point, the opportunity for some of the interventions aimed at minimising the impact of the disease has passed. Nurses working in general practice are well placed to recognise people at risk for CKD, diagnose them early and ensure that treatment is initiated and optimised to protect their renal and cardiovascular health.

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 21 May 2009
Category: Editorial

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