Unique, practical knowledge for nurses responsible for daily management of patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related conditions.

Editorial

Friday, 27 February 2015

Most nurses are involved in the care of the 1% of the population currently nearing the end of their lives: that is, people considered to be in their final year, months, weeks or days of life. The Gold Standards Framework (GSF) programmes can help provide a structured framework in this challenging area, leading to more proactive and consistent standards of care, and enabling more people to live well and die well where they choose.

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Wednesday, 03 December 2014

The World Health Organization has recommended that everyone should be eating more foods that contain potassium, and we routinely measure this electrolyte as part of the standard U&Es blood test. But why is potassium important for our health, and why do we need to worry if a patient's levels are too high or too low?

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Wednesday, 03 December 2014

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the commonest cardiac arrhythmia seen in primary care and, if left untreated, is a significant risk factor for stroke. New guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) include some practice-changing recommendations on diagnosing AF, the role of aspirin and the novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), and shared decision-making to ensure patient-centred care.

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Wednesday, 03 December 2014

Chronic heart failure (CHF) continues to be a leading cause of death and readmission to hospital in the UK. Since the availability of specialist CHF services is variable, many patients rely on practice nurses to review their care. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines have proved very helpful, but are now a cause for confusion as new evidence changes the management of heart failure.

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Wednesday, 03 December 2014

In the UK, an estimated 1 million people with diabetes use injectable therapies, and these patients are increasingly being managed in primary care. As a result, more primary care nurses are taking responsibility for the initiation and continuing management of injectable therapies, including advising on and reviewing an individual patient's injection technique.

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Wednesday, 03 December 2014

For years dieters have been trying to avoid fat, and low-fat products have been promoted as the healthier option. But there is now a great deal of publicity around sugar and its toxic effects on our health, including claims that it is the 'new tobacco'. The sweet white stuff is being blamed for the obesity epidemic and with it diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. So what is the evidence behind the hype, and what should we as health professionals be advising patients?

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Wednesday, 03 December 2014

More people than ever are making trips overseas. Many of us have long-term conditions that we manage with lifestyle choices and medication or medical devices. You may have high blood pressure, angina, a previous heart attack, heart failure or another heart condition. This leaflet will help remind you of some of the advice given to you in a pre-travel consultation with your practice nurse or travel nurse.

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Wednesday, 03 December 2014

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common cause of abnormal liver function tests. Current advice is simply to monitor patients' liver function, but is this really correct? And how do we identify and manage people at risk of developing NAFLD?

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