Unique, practical knowledge for nurses responsible for daily management of patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related conditions.

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Friday, 21 October 2016

The large randomised controlled trial PARADIGM-HF showed that treatment with sacubitril/valsartan (Entresto) compared with enalapril reduced the risk of hospitalisation, cardiovascular and all-cause mortality and improved symptoms in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. This article describes the key results and how they can be applied in primary care.

Category: Editorial
Friday, 21 October 2016

This article describes the use of sacubitril/valsartan – the first-in-class angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) in primary care and how the new drug fits in the heart failure treatment pathway. Current guidelines and case studies are also explored to provide further understanding of this latest HF treatment to enter clinical use.

Category: Editorial
Friday, 21 October 2016

This article gives an overview of sacubitril/valsartan (Entresto), a first-in-class angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor comprising valsartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker and the neprilysin inhibitor sacubitril. The drug has been approved for the treatment of symptomatic (NYHA class (II-IV) chronic heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF) in adults.

Category: Editorial
Monday, 26 November 2007

Sitagliptin (trade name Januvia) is the first in a new class of drugs for diabetes – the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. This new, oral hypoglycaemic agent has recently been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It is available on prescription and can be prescribed in primary care. Principal advantages include lack of weight gain and hypoglycaemia, which should make sitagliptin very popular with patients. This article looks at what a DPP-4 inhibitor is and how it works to lower blood glucose, as well as where this class of drug fits into current practice.

Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 14 August 2007

Stable angina is very common. Just under two million people in the UK – over one million men and 840,000 women – have, or have had, angina. In this article we review how new-onset stable angina is assessed, including an update on new investigations, and the latest treatment options including drugs and interventions, based on the most up-to-date guidelines and current practice.

Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 12 September 2012
Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 16 July 2008
Category: Editorial

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