Unique, practical knowledge for nurses responsible for daily management of patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related conditions.

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Tuesday, 21 February 2006
Category: Back to Basics
Friday, 21 November 2008

Lipohypertrophy is surprisingly common in people using insulin to control their diabetes. As more and more people with diabetes are managed in primary care, practice nurses take on a greater role in the management and education of these patients. This article considers what lipohypertrophy is, how it can be prevented and how it should be managed once it has been identified.

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 21 May 2009

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a high mortality rate once it reaches the most severe stage. However, complications can be reduced and even prevented if it is diagnosed and treated earlier. Many people who develop CKD become symptomatic only when the disease is well established. By that point, the opportunity for some of the interventions aimed at minimising the impact of the disease has passed. Nurses working in general practice are well placed to recognise people at risk for CKD, diagnose them early and ensure that treatment is initiated and optimised to protect their renal and cardiovascular health.

Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 28 September 2011

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a high mortality rate once it reaches the most severe stage. However, complications can be reduced and even prevented if it is diagnosed and treated earlier. Many people who develop CKD become symptomatic only when the disease is well established. By that point, the opportunity for some of the interventions aimed at minimising the impact of the disease has passed. Nurses working in general practice are well placed to recognise people at risk for CKD, diagnose them early and ensure that treatment is initiated and optimised to protect their renal and cardiovascular health.

Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 03 December 2014

In the UK, an estimated 1 million people with diabetes use injectable therapies, and these patients are increasingly being managed in primary care. As a result, more primary care nurses are taking responsibility for the initiation and continuing management of injectable therapies, including advising on and reviewing an individual patient's injection technique.

Category: Editorial
Monday, 27 April 2009

How much insulin does a patient with type 2 diabetes need for optimal glucose control? It can sometimes be a tricky balancing act to get the dose just right – too much increases the risk of hypoglycaemic episodes and too little risks poor glucose control and the associated long-term complications.In this article we review what the research and guidelines recommend in how to ensure each patient gets the best dose of insulin.

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 08 September 2016

Intensified and multifaceted treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and poor prognosis due to microalbuminuria extends median lifetime by 8 years compared with conventional therapy, according to a new long-term Danish follow-up study of the Steno-2 trial.

Friday, 07 December 2012

Dapagliflozin (Forxiga) is the first in a new class of oral antidiabetic drug that has been given the go-ahead for marketing in Europe, including the UK. Described as a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, this new preparation works on the kidneys to lower blood glucose. What does this new drug have to offer and how can it potentially help our patients with type 2 diabetes?

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 23 December 2010

What is important when a nurse and patient are together in a consultation? Most of us have had consultations where the discussion did not appear to achieve anything, while, on other occasions, both parties seemed to be working well together. This article looks at how to share the process of planning treatment with a patient to improve health outcomes; it examines what concordance is, and how to achieve it, looking at how this might work out in practice.

Category: Editorial

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