Unique, practical knowledge for nurses responsible for daily management of patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related conditions.

Wednesday, 08 June 2005

Isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) – an increase in the higher of the two numbers when blood pressure (BP) is measured – is the commonest type of high BP in older people over the age of 60. The systolic pressure used to be dismissed as less important than the lower number – diastolic BP – but studies have shown that it is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. ISH accounts for up to 75% of the overall incidence of uncontrolled hypertension in the elderly and appears to be more common in women than men.

Category: Editorial
Topics covered:
Wednesday, 08 June 2005

People with diabetes used to be advised to watch their carbohydrate – particularly sugar – intake. But dietary recommendations have developed over the past few years so that they are now similar to the healthy diet that we should all be eating. Are there any remaining differences in what we should be telling patients with diabetes about their diet? Fewer than you might think. In this article we take a 'supermarket tour' that explains what patients with diabetes should be putting in their trolleys and what they should be leaving on the shelves.

Category: Editorial
Topics covered:
Wednesday, 08 June 2005

The number of people with diabetes in the UK is almost 1.8 million and this is continuing to rise, according to recent figures. But only about half of these are currently diagnosed. It is obviously essential to ensure that these people are diagnosed as early as possible and then managed appropriately to ensure they receive the best possible care to minimise long-term complications. In this article, we review how to diagnose diabetes accurately, based on good practice recommended in standard two of the National Service Framework (NSF) for Diabetes. What should we be measuring in people who present with the classic symptoms and in those who do not to ensure an accurate diagnosis of diabetes?

Category: Editorial
Topics covered:
Wednesday, 08 June 2005

Some fat is essential for maintaining good health, in order to provide essential fatty acids and the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. Essential fatty acids can only be derived from foods because they cannot be synthesised by the body. However, the hard truth is that essential fatty acids represent only a very small amount of total energy needs and most people still consume too much fat. How much fat should we be eating? What is the difference between different types of fats and what advice should we be giving patients about fats to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease?

Category: Editorial
Topics covered:
Wednesday, 08 June 2005
Category: Back to Basics
Topics covered:
Thursday, 14 April 2005

Stroke is common, affecting around one in four people over the age of 45 at some time in their lives. Increasing age is a major risk factor for stroke, so the numbers of people suffering a stroke will increase with the ageing population. Primary care teams have a central role in providing effective secondary prevention, but because patients often fall between primary and secondary care, things may be missed. Taking a systematic approach to assessing risk factors, such as blood pressure, and treating them effectively can significantly reduce further stroke risk.

Category: Editorial
Topics covered:
Thursday, 14 April 2005

Rehabilitation after a myocardial infarction (MI) includes all aspects of a patient's life – medical, physical and social. Sexual functioning is an important part of most people's lives. Fears about whether having sexual intercourse could trigger another heart attack is the question many post-MI patients want to ask but embarrassment may stop them. Giving accurate information about sex after an MI is just as much a part of patient education as telling them about cholesterol and blood pressure and can go a long way to helping recovery and preventing further problems such as sexual dysfunction.

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 14 April 2005

An increasing number of patients are prescribed statins because of the growing evidence that they can dramatically reduce cardiovascular events. However, the withdrawal of one statin – cerivastatin – some time ago may have made some patients concerned about their safety. What should we be telling patients about the benefits of statins, how long they should take them for and whether there are any risks with these widely used agents?

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 14 April 2005

For people with long-term conditions, self-care can have as much, if not more, influence on their health than prescribed medication and treatment. Yet, in many cases, healthcare professionals become frustrated when attempts to improve peoples' self-care behaviours prove unsuccessful. This article looks at some of the reasons why it can be difficult to encourage people with diabetes or cardiovascular disease to look after themselves effectively; what types of practice can help us to increase people's success in managing long-term conditions; and how we can incorporate empowering techniques in our day-to-day consultations.

Category: Editorial
Thursday, 14 April 2005

Patients with diabetes are at high risk of cardiovascular disease and aspirin is an important part of prevention strategies. Although it is effective and relatively well-tolerated, studies have shown that many patients with diabetes are not taking aspirin. In this article, we review why aspirin should be considered in patients with diabetes, the benefits it might achieve and areas where caution is required.

Category: Editorial
Topics covered:

Article search and filter